Sourcebook
Promising Practices:
Campus Alcohol Strategies

 
CURRICULUM

Directory of Curriculum Programs


The academic curriculum is a rapidly emerging component of campus programs; courses dealing with alcohol-related issues, curriculum infusion, lesson plans, lectures and other course-based endeavors are a part of this approach. Two-year and community colleges are especially well served by this approach, as are institutions with a large commuter population.
 
Alcohol-related issues can be incorporated in numerous courses: health, substance abuse, addiction, chemical dependency, counseling, nutrition, women’s issues, neuropharmacology, cultural history, and education. Courses in media, debate, physiology, religion, management, nursing, communications, and history are also excellent areas for curriculum infusion (Northeastern Illinois University, Eastern Michigan University, Shenandoah University and Illinois State University).
 
Academic courses can be part of an overall programmatic emphasis, such as a program for dentists and hygienists (Baylor College of Dentistry) or total emphasis of a degree program (The Union Institute). The goals of the campus alcohol abuse prevention effort are best served when information included in academic courses is related to the students’ lives, is integrated into their academic discipline, and emphasizes lifestyle and choices. Professionals observe that it is helpful to emphasize that alcohol abuse is not simply a health problem.
 
Relevant course content may be offered in a full course, such as the Substance Abuse/Addictions courses at several universities, or through course modules. Special projects (Iowa State University and University of California at Santa Barbara), papers or areas of analysis involving alcohol can be used to meet class requirements (Plymouth State College).
 
Unique ideas include "floating lectures" in which trained personnel provide presentations in designated classes. Using a substitute trained in alcohol-related issues to replace a faculty member who must miss a class is another strategy (University of Missouri - Columbia and University of Portland).
 
Alcohol-related topics may be offered as part of academic courses during an awareness week (Augsburg College and Eastern Illinois University). Courses may also be offered during orientation and include issues specifically for first-year students (Parks College of Saint Louis University and University of Oregon). Courses for special populations (Northern Illinois University) and the integration of alcohol abuse issues within a wellness course (Gettysburg College and the University of Northern Iowa) are additional approaches.
 
Another option is to use peers in these areas. Peer educators or counselors and student members of alcohol abuse prevention committees may enroll in special courses and receive academic credit (Marshall University and St. Louis College of Pharmacy).
 
Professionals with projects in this section state that, for curriculum involvement to be successful, it must be made fun and simple for both the faculty and the students. Training of faculty members is a very helpful aspect of this process.
 
It is important to emphasize that involvement in the academic setting takes a long time to develop, and therefore patience and continued enthusiasm on behalf of the campus program personnel is essential. To build faculty support, it is necessary to maintain communication with participants, and with those faculty members who are not yet participating. Incentives, such as thank you letters or periodic luncheons, encourage support.
 
DIRECTORY OF CURRICULUM PROGRAMS

Alcohol and Drug Abuse Education: Baylor College of Dentistry, The Union Institute
Alcohol Unit Within Wellness Course: Gettysburg College, University of Northern Iowa
Alcohol Use and Abuse: Bloomsburg University
Concentration in Substance Abuse/Addictions: Troy State University at Montgomery
Consortia Curriculum Infusion Project: Rowan University
Course Module Development Grants: College of Charleston Courses for Special Populations: Northern Illinois University
Curriculum Infusion Project: Illinois State University
Curriculum Infusion Program: Eastern Michigan University
Curriculum Infusion Strategies: Illinois State University, Shenandoah University
Filling the Media Gap: Iowa State University
Freshman Seminar: Parks College of Saint Louis University, University of Oregon
OPTIONS Program: Richard Stockton College
Peer Leadership Classes: Marshall University, St. Louis College of Pharmacy
Prevention Across The Curriculum: Northeastern Illinois University
Replacement Class Lecturers: University of Missouri - Columbia, University of Portland
Special Topics During Alcohol Awareness Week: Augsburg College, Eastern Illinois University
Student Prevention Projects: University of California at Santa Barbara
Substance Abuse/Addictions Course: Cabrini College, Elizabethtown College, Millersville University
Substance Abue Prevention Program: University of Oregon
Writing From Interviews: Plymouth State College

 
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Education

Contacts:

Baylor College of Dentistry
Enrollment: 484
Private, Four Year Institution
 
Eric S. Solomon, D.D.S.
Associate Dean
Student Services
 
Tommy W. Gage, D.D.S., Ph.D. (E-mail)
Professor
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Pharmacology
Baylor College of Dentistry
P.O. Box 660677
Dallas, TX 75266-0677
(214) 828-8308
 
The Union Institute
Enrollment: 1,800
Private, Four Year Institution
 
M. Daniel Price, Ph.D. (E-mail)
Professor
Center for Distant Learning
440 E. McMillan
Cincinnati, OH 45206
(513) 861-6400
 

Objectives:

• To teach future health care professionals how to recognize and manage addiction and recovery
 
• To provide academic course work on alcohol and drug issues
 
• To provide students with factual information to assist them in making independent decisions about alcohol consumption
 

Description:

The Baylor College of Dentistry has included a program of alcohol and drug abuse information in its curriculum for more than 25 years; it is part of the requirements for dental and hygiene students. Societal implications, pharmacology of substances of abuse, hazards associated with specific substances, legal implications and requirements and recognition and treatment of patients with alcohol or drug addiction, as well as patients in recovery are addressed. The curriculum also presents information on alcohol or drug addictions among health care professionals with high educational levels, professional training, and responsibility for patients.
 
Building on the model program established by the American Dental Association for teaching drug and alcohol abuse education in the dental curriculum, the program includes members of the Texas Dental Peer Assistance Program, local, state and federal law enforcement officers, and members of the State Board of Dental Examiners.
 
The Texas state board requires the exam on drug and alcohol abuse topics; questions for the exam are prepared by faculty members responsible for these topics in the dental colleges. A study booklet developed by the three colleges assists students in their preparation for the examination. In addition to pharmacology faculty, the faculty for the courses also includes dentists in recovery, interveners and law enforcement members. Faculty and staff receive ongoing training and education on issues related to alcohol.
 
The Union Institute offers a unique approach for obtaining a bachelor’s degree with an emphasis on either Alcohol/Drug Abuse Counseling or Treatment Center Management. Designed for professionals in the field, the program allows self-directed efforts through the use of an electronic bulletin board system with a toll-free telephone number. This distance learning approach allows for communication and interaction apart from the constraints of time and place. Supplemented by regional seminars three times a year, the peer-based approach brings together learners who are professionals in the field who do not yet have a bachelor’s degree.
 
A significant feature of the program is a Senior Project, which provides a capstone experience designed to bring together the learning outcomes of several courses into a comprehensive research based product. Through this, new learning and knowledge is contributed to the field of alcohol/drug counseling. Through the electronic bulletin board, further interaction occurs with the program’s doctoral candidates.

 
Alcohol Unit Within Wellness Course

Contacts:

Gettysburg College
Enrollment: 2,126
Private, Four Year Institution
 
Barbara Streeter (E-mail)
Wellness Course Coordinator
Health and Exercise Science
Box 432
Gettysburg College
Gettysburg, PA 17325
(717) 337-6323
 
University of Northern Iowa
Enrollment: 12,806
Public, Four Year Institution
 
Thomas M. Davis, H.S.D. (E-mail)
Associate Professor
School of HPELS
University of Northern Iowa
Cedar Falls, IA 50614-0241
(319) 273-6151
 

Objectives:

• To incorporate alcohol issues into an existing wellness course
 
• To provide students with an overview of alcohol use and the consequences of alcohol abuse
 

Description:

One strategy used by these two institutions is the incorporation of alcohol topics into an already existing wellness course. At the University of Northern Iowa, the required three credit "Personal Wellness" course is a general education topic for all undergraduate students. The course has six topics: Decision Making, Exercise, Nutrition and Weight Management, Stress Management, Leisure Time Utilization, and Contemporary Health Threats. The Contemporary Health Threats unit presents a series of five integrated lectures that address the topics of alcohol consumption and sexual decision making. At Gettysburg College, the wellness course is required of all first-year students. This course covers six areas representing the six basic components of wellness (Physical, Emotional, Intellectual, Spiritual, Social and Environmental), a Health Risk Appraisal and a group class project.
 
The reasons for establishing each of these courses are fairly similar. At Gettysburg College, the course assists every first year student in examining his/her values and beliefs at the beginning of the academic career and promotes conscious decisions about specific health-related behaviors and choices. The University of Northern Iowa implemented this course in a curriculum revision because of a desire to prepare a more prescriptive general education curriculum.
 
The content of the alcohol section in these courses covers numerous issues. At the University of Northern Iowa, topics include levels of substance abuse; relationship between substance abuse, sexual risk taking and self-acceptance; influences on drinking decisions; impact of normative behaviors; advertising and the availability of campus resources; emphasis on low-risk choices; and strategies for managing blood alcohol concentrations. At Gettysburg College, the content of the alcohol topics covers alcohol and drug issues. Gettysburg College incorporates reflection papers on health-related topics and reflective journal entries after each class.
 
Instruction of these courses is handled in different ways. Gettysburg College has different instructors for each of the courses. Since nearly 40 sections of the course are offered during the first semester, approximately 30 instructors are needed. An extensive training program is offered to new wellness instructors with experienced instructors participating in a training update. With this level of instructional staff, the class size is maintained at 15 students. The University of Northern Iowa emphasizes an applied approach. Students are involved in role playing, review of current advertising and discussion of self-reported data collected from students on the campus.
 
At Gettysburg College, documented outcomes include a supportive academic environment in which new and transfer students can explore health-related topics as part of a successful transition to the college. Results of follow-up surveys demonstrate that students learn about campus resources, are aware of the assistance of others in the classroom and gain specific areas of knowledge. At the University of Northern Iowa, questionnaires document student behavior and attitudes on a biennial basis. This 100-item Health Interests and Practices Questionnaire assesses the value of lectures specific to alcohol as well as alcohol consumption.

 
Courses for Special Populations

Contact:

Northern Illinois University
Enrollment: 10,228
Public, Four Year Institution
 
Michael P. Haines, M.S. (E-mail)
Coordinator
Health Enhancement Services
University Health Service
Northern Illinois University
DeKalb, IL 60115
(815) 753-9745
 

Objectives:

• To offer academic courses targeting specific majors
 
• To better prepare students for the role of alcohol in their designated professions
 

Description:

Academic courses for specific professional majors are an appropriate way of targeting the unique needs of academic groups. The effort at Northern Illinois University assists in preparing undergraduate students for professions in counseling, law enforcement, business and education. The "Social and Individual Patterns of Alcohol Use" course is designed to prepare students for the alcohol issues they may have to address in their future careers. Further, it is designed to reduce alcohol-related harm and promote safe alcohol use. The course addresses the historic and cross-cultural use of alcohol, the pharmacology of use and the effects of alcoholism on individuals and social systems.
 
Because of the likelihood of their heavy use of alcohol and related negative consequences, undergraduates are targeted for this course. The course content includes the history of alcohol and its use; the mechanisms of the body’s processing alcohol; strategies to respond to drinking pressure; characteristics that distinguish responsible use from problem drinking and alcoholism; how to identify a personal safe drink limit; the role of denial and confrontation; components of an alcoholism treatment program; a variety of educational, environmental and legislative prevention strategies; and alcohol-related controversies.
 
Much of this course is conducted in an applied manner. For example, students are expected to prepare a personal plan for maintaining a healthy relationship with alcohol or another potentially harmful substance. Homework assignments further represent the applied approach: students do field observations as an anthropologist or journalist, and they interview several "responsible" or "healthy" drinkers. In group assignments, students prepare mock testimony for Congress, serve in a simulated legal defense case, participate in a debate on alcohol advertising and identify public information, education and/or legislative approaches for reducing heavy drinking.
 
In addition, four tests are included as course requirements. Each test asks students to identify the maximum number of drinks they can consume in a given time period without exceeding a 0.05 blood alcohol concentration. The students are given a pre-test and a post-test that assess the quantity and frequency of alcohol use, as well as the frequency of alcohol-related experiences. Results demonstrate a reduction in the heavy use of alcohol as well as a reduction in the negative consequences.

 
Curriculum Infusion Program

Contact:

Eastern Michigan University
Enrollment: 23,777
Public, Four Year Institution
 
Ellen Gold, M.B.A., M.S.Ed. (E-mail)
Director
University Health Services
Snow Health Center
Eastern Michigan University
Ypsilanti, MI 48197
(734) 487-1107
 

Objectives:

• To improve faculty members’ involvement in campus prevention efforts
 
• To prepare approaches to reach commuter students
 
• To motivate administrators to become active resources for students
 

Description:

The Curriculum Infusion Program is one aspect of the university’s broad-based substance abuse prevention program. It was developed because leaders of the campus-wide prevention effort believed that a critical campus resource – faculty –was virtually untapped. The effort includes academic courses, drug and alcohol modules, classroom presentations, learning experiences and accessible resources. Effective mechanisms were designed to reach the university’s large commuter student population. To assist in this implementation, a Curriculum Infusion Advisory Board was established.
 
To become familiar with the program’s goals and objectives, faculty and staff members attend orientation meetings where they are introduced to the variety of resources for module development that are available in the university’s Health Resource Library.
 
A bi-monthly Curriculum Infusion Newsletter is prepared to further promote insights in infusion efforts. Faculty members also gain insights into student attitudes and opinions about alcohol and drugs through the distribution of surveys in their classrooms. Additionally, faculty and staff have attended workshops to better understand the issues surrounding drug and alcohol use by students.
 
Learning modules within the curriculum have been developed for use in a variety of disciplines; these include such areas as computer science, business and psychology. In addition, modules exist for inclusion in the university-wide orientation courses. Some of the modules involve students in fieldwork on the subject of drugs and alcohol, while others incorporate research or community service as part of the class assignments.
 
Staff from the University Health Services and Campus Peers are available to make presentations in specific courses. These personnel are also available to assist faculty members in developing assignments and practical classroom learning experiences with drug and alcohol issues, and in the development of learning modules.
 
In reviewing the project’s implementation, staff members report success with the development and use of 12 different learning modules in the classroom and the incorporation of drug and alcohol information into diverse subject areas. They also cite the ability to disseminate and replicate the learning modules on other college campuses.

 
Curriculum Infusion Strategies

Contacts:

Illinois State University
Enrollment: 4,100
Public, Four Year Institution
 
Roger B. Weller, Ph.D. (E-mail)
Health Educator
2540 Student Health Service
Illinois State University
Normal, IL 61790
(309) 438-5948
 
Shenandoah University
Enrollment: 1,652
Private, Four Year Institution
 
Judith Landes, M.Ed.S. (E-mail)
Director, Academic Support Services
1460 University Drive
Winchester, VA 22601
(540) 665-4928
 

Objectives:

• To create a partnership to further alcohol abuse prevention between student affairs and academic affairs
 
• To promote healthy lifestyles among students
 

Description:

Illinois State University and Shenandoah University each initiated an intensive effort to promote drug and alcohol abuse information into the existing courses in the academic curriculum. Both universities hope to encourage faculty members to include information, modules, examples, and assignments supporting substance abuse prevention efforts in their courses.
 
Shenandoah University initially distributed a memorandum prepared by a faculty member who expressed a concern about his students’ lack of knowledge in this area; this had little effect. Contact with faculty members was then made by identifying those who might be receptive to incorporating this information into their courses. Presentations were made at a faculty retreat by faculty members who were beginning their infusions. This exposure, combined with the success stories of other faculty, made a major difference that helped the program to succeed. During the program’s initial start-up, $500 stipends were offered to faculty members who presented successful proposals to infuse their course curricula with substance abuse modules. An additional incentive for participation at Shenandoah University is two yearly Excellence in Substance Abuse Education awards, which are given to faculty members who successfully infuse courses.
 
The program at Illinois State University is implemented by an emeritus professor. Through the assistance of Chairs of departments that were initially deemed most appropriate for this topic, faculty members were sent a letter inviting them to participate in a half-day workshop. A $100 stipend was offered for participation. Workshop topics included the philosophy of curriculum infusion, information on substance use, signs and symptoms of abuse, what a faculty member can do to deal with an individual identified with substance abuse problems, and ideas for infusing drug and alcohol concepts into the curriculum.
 
Faculty members were informed that they were key players in the effort. They were told that their involvement "ranges from merely identification of students at risk to taking advantage of ‘teachable moments’ and ultimately to unit blocks dealing with specific alcohol (or other drug) issues." They were further told that the extent to which their curriculum is infused is left entirely to their discretion – "there is no modification of course objectives, outline or content."
 
Specific modules included at Shenandoah University are Wellness and Substance Abuse Issues for Human Resource Managers, Opposing Viewpoints, Alcohol and Aggression, Religious Attitudes toward Alcohol and Drugs and Economic Impact of Alcohol and Drug Use. Topics are also included in academic departments such as Mass Communication, Dance History, Health Education, Urban Geography, Nursing, Biology, Anatomy/Physiology, Kinesiology, and English as a Second Language.
 
At Illinois State University, strategies (and their courses) include environmental agents that cause birth defects (in Our Global Environment: A Health Perspective); use of alcohol examples when discussing pollutants and chemicals in our environment (in Environmental Toxicology); fetal alcohol syndrome (in Introduction to Multi-Cultural Education); the effect alcohol has on nutrients (in Nutrition); how alcohol’s effects change as one ages and synergistic effects of drugs with alcohol (in Health Aspects of Aging); date rape (in Courtship and Marriage); and how the media uses the principles of attitude change (in Dynamics of Social Behavior).
 
In the Contemporary Applications program at Shenandoah University, all curriculum infusions have an evaluation component that include questions on tests and exams, class projects, papers and presentations, pre/post-testing of information presented, anecdotal stories and formal evaluation of modules.

 
Filling the Media Gap

Contact:

Iowa State University
Enrollment: 24,990
Public, Four Year Institution
 
Lisa Safaeinili, M.P.H.
(New Contact: Charles Cychosz) (E-mail)
Manager
Crime Prevention, Research and Training Office
151 Armory, Department of Public Safety
Ames, IA 50011
(515) 294-8760
 

Objectives:

• To help change environmental norms on alcohol
 
• To involve students in the various phases of the media campaign process
 
• To incorporate alcohol abuse prevention strategies into the classroom
 

Description:

Building on a discussion at a statewide consortium at the university level, a media campaign addressing alcohol use was identified as a project. The consortium leaders instituted a contest among the universities, with the best ideas printed and shared by all. Key classes such as English, Advertising and Journalism were targeted.
 
Initially, the campus professors identified were contacted by a staff member on the campus. Key information was provided so that the project would not be a time-consuming addition to their class load. On the campus, the faculty involved required a staff person to be present for the first class and for the final evaluation of the projects; peer leaders were involved during the course of the class.
 
In participating classes, the overall design is to have the peer leader(s) act as the client, while the class acts as an ad agency, a graphic arts department or other service provider relevant to the nature of the academic course. The overall goal is to have students add alcohol use and abuse as part of their normal course curriculum, and to focus creative components of their class on developing products that will be meaningful and appropriate for their peers on the campus.
 
In the implementation of this process, peer leaders encourage humor, a strong message that can be remembered and a message that peers on campus will identify as positive or that will encourage positive activity. In some classes, students find it helpful to see examples of ads on the topic that have been created by professional agencies. Students in the classroom are provided with production deadlines and are asked to provide drafts in accordance with deadlines.
 
The course instructor is encouraged to incorporate the alcohol abuse prevention theme in the class syllabus, as well as to hold discussions on this topic during the course. For example, advertising classes may talk about identifying the target audience, strategy development, market research, action for the consumer to take, issues to consider, and slang terms used and ideas offered by students when they talk about alcohol.
 
At the university, target audiences identified were incoming freshmen, upper class students, "party animals," fraternity men, "low risk users," and younger students. Issues identified were drinking and driving, drinking and unplanned sexual encounters, drinking and the future, and drinking and violence. The students also identified actions that they wanted their peers to take; these include drinking less or not at all, taking greater control of their surroundings and making healthier choices.
 
In the program design, materials developed were reviewed by a panel of students representing a variety of student groups. The materials selected for printing were made into posters and included the name of the individual and the class from which the project evolved. Also included at the bottom of the poster was a tagline giving the percentage of students who choose to drink between zero and two drinks when partying, reinforcing the fact that many students are not drinking a lot. The printed posters were distributed to all universities in the state.
 
Journalism and advertising professors evaluated the attitude of students in class before and after the project, finding a change in attitude and awareness of false norms among the majority of the class participating in the project. Most of the students felt that the project had made them look at their own drinking habits. Further, a booklet entitled "Filling the Media Gap: A Curriculum-Based Strategy Using Peers and the Classroom to Address Substance Abuse" was prepared to facilitate replication of this process.
 

 
Freshman Seminar

Contacts:

Parks College of Saint Louis University
Enrollment: 16,681
Private, Four Year Institution
 
Carol D. Lunning, M.S.
Assistant Director of Student Affairs
Parks College of Saint Louis University
500 Falling Springs Road
Cahokia, IL 62206
(618) 337-7575
 
University of Oregon
Enrollment: 813
Public, Four Year Institution
 
Jane DeGidio, Ph.D.
Director
Office of Student Academic Progress
5256 University of Oregon
Eugene, OR 97403-5256
(541) 346-1144
 
Linda Devine, M.P.A. (E-mail)
Assistant Director
Office of Student Life Retention Programs
5216 University of Oregon
Eugene, OR 97403-5216
(541) 346-1123
 

Objectives:

• To provide a course to assist new students in their early college experience
 
• To assist students in making sound decisions concerning their personal lifestyles, relationships, academic commitments and careers
 

Description:

Courses targeting first-year students are offered to assist them in their adjustment to the institutional setting. An emphasis on alcohol abuse prevention is included in many of these, as documented in these two offerings.
 
The Building Community Program, incorporated into the University Freshman Seminars Experience, has grown over the past several years at the University of Oregon. Faculty are actively involved in this program which includes a course for first-term freshmen, and addresses issues of diversity, multi-culturalism, the development of communities and responsible behavior. Skills to resolve differences in communities are also presented. The impetus for this course was an increase in problematic incidents, many of which appeared to be fueled in part by student use of drugs or alcohol. Developed collaboratively by faculty, students and staff, the course provides a small group experience with faculty and peer mentors and offers lectures/events that include students from all of the course sections. Through this course, it is hoped that students will "connect" with one another and be more accepting of differences in beliefs and cultures, and that they will support the rights of others to make their own decisions, even when these decisions do not meet their perceptions of existing campus norms.
 
At Parks College of Saint Louis University, the Professional Development course provides incoming students with an opportunity to enhance their academic skills, learn leadership skills, develop interpersonal skills and promote their success in college. Topics addressed in the classes focus on health and wellness issues, including alcohol/drug awareness and the role alcohol consumption can play in safety issues, sexual activity and communicable diseases. Discussion focuses on the effects of alcohol abuse, values clarification, effective communication skills, decision-making skills and responsibility for one’s actions. Alcohol-related topics are often featured in students’ weekly presentations and class discussions to promote an awareness of the possible negative effects of alcohol on their lives and to develop a sense of their personal responsibility as students and citizens of the broader college community.
 
At Parks College, the course is taught by the Assistant Director of Student Activities and features guest speakers and peer educators who are knowledgeable in the specific topic of discussion. The Coordinator of Student Health and the Coordinator of Counseling assist in developing and presenting topics such as alcohol/drug use and abuse and their relationship to safety issues and sexually-transmitted diseases. The majority of students surveyed report that the class and related topics had a positive effect on their lives as students. Upper class students frequently report long-term benefits of the program in dealing with other students and their problems.
 
Results from the University of Oregon demonstrate that those involved in the Building Community Program use drugs or alcohol at a rate lower than that of the entire student body and significantly lower than that of other freshmen. It is also interesting to note that students involved in the Building Community Program often assume leadership roles on the campus.
 

 
Peer Leadership Classes

Contacts:

Marshall University
Enrollment: 12,659
Public, Four Year Institution
 
Carla Lapelle, M.A. (E-mail)
Coordinator
Student Health Education Programs
145 Prichard Hall
Marshall University
Huntington, WV 25755
(304) 696-4800
 
St. Louis College of Pharmacy
Enrollment: 820
Private, Four Year Institution
 
Susan Holbrook, M.A.
(New Contact: Ken Wetstein)
Leadership Director
4588 Parkview Place
St. Louis, MO 63110-1088
(314) 367-8700, Ext. 1086
 

Objectives:

• To prepare students to provide skill-based services on alcohol issues
 
• To create a cadre of students knowledgeable about alcohol
 
• To offer courses that have a direct impact on the campus environment
 

Description:

Academic support for students who are preparing for the delivery of services is demonstrated by these two campus-based initiatives. Courses provide academic grounding to the students and formal recognition of the unique role they play as they work with their peers and try to affect the campus environment.
 
Peer courses range from a one-credit course to a series of more extensive courses. The Peer Counseling/Alcohol Abuse Prevention course at Marshall University is a one-credit class offered through the Department of Counseling and Rehabilitation. At the St. Louis College of Pharmacy, three seminar courses, each ranging from two/three credits, are available in a leadership track; students are trained as peer mentors, peer educators and/or peer counselors. Students are taught the process of leadership using the content of substance abuse prevention that is relevant to their professional goals.
 
The St. Louis College of Pharmacy provides a helpful way of distinguishing different content areas for different student needs. The "Leadership Seminar" is used to train peer mentors. Students in this course identify values and develop self-confidence to act according to those values. The course helps students to understand the value of community service, promotes a sense of responsibility and assists in the development of group facilitation skills. Students in this course serve as "mentors" to first-year students. The "Leadership: Team Building Class" offered for peer educators, uses the concepts and theories of team building to create a positive learning and social environment. In the context of chemical dependency, students learn what is involved in changing the accepted norms of behavior with regard to substance abuse. The third course in this series, offered for peer counselors, is entitled "Leadership: Coaching and Counseling." Students learn to recognize the effects of substance abuse and learn identification and assessment strategies. They study treatment modalities, gain awareness of community resources and use writing as a tool to analyze and evaluate treatment strategies.
 
The content of the Marshall University curriculum emphasizes laws, confrontation and intervention skills, identification and discussion of feelings, and strategies for working with denial. It further emphasizes the physiological and psychological aspects of alcohol use. In this course, students choose a behavior that they want to change and work through a behavior change model. They explore feelings associated with alcohol abuse and learn signs and symptoms to help them recognize and deal with abuse. Methods used in the course include writing a journal, teaching other students, polling others regarding drinking norms and knowledge about laws, researching nutrition, presentation and interpersonal skills, and role-playing scenarios. Students are also required to teach friends or other students the information that they learn in class and record those individuals’ responses. For example, class members must help three other students calculate a BAC (blood alcohol concentration) and the number of drinks each person can consume per hour without becoming legally intoxicated. Another example is that class members develop nutrition and calorie information about various alcoholic beverages and compare it to foods. Also class members poll others about their knowledge of drinking laws and inform them of the laws of the state. Through this process, staff members learn to adjust their presentation to meet their listeners’ needs. Many of the situations used for the role plays were developed by the students as a group. Although the course is not intended to teach students how to counsel substance abusers, it does give students the confidence to refer peers to appropriate resources. Results from this course demonstrate that students are developing a different perception of addiction and behavior change.

 
Prevention Across The Curriculum

Contact:

Northeastern Illinois University
Enrollment: 10,288
Public, Four Year Institution
 
A. Alyce Claerbaut, M.A.
Coordinator, Student Outreach & External Affairs
5500 North St. Louis Avenue
Chicago, IL 60625-4699
(312) 794-2967
 

Objectives:

• To reach students on a 100% commuter campus
 
• To provide referral information for those who use or abuse or are affected by another’s use or abuse of alcohol and/or drugs
 
• To document the effects of curriculum infusion efforts
 

Description:

The Partners in Prevention (PIP) program was designed in 1987 to reach students on a 100% commuter campus. Through the PIP Program, the university has implemented the infusion of alcohol and drug information into the curriculum. The program began with 11 faculty who developed prevention modules to fit courses that they were offering in three of the university’s colleges.
 
The provost provides funding each year for five grants of $500 for tenure-track faculty to develop alcohol/drug modules for courses that they currently offer. Funds may be used for travel to conferences or workshops, instructional material and other professional expenses. A brief application form consists of four questions: why the course would be appropriate for a prevention unit, strategies the applicant might employ to influence student attitudes or behavior, the involvement of students as active learners, and reasons for the applicant’s interest. Faculty who receive grants participate in a series of four training workshops. Information on substance abuse and prevention strategies and on the special needs of urban commuter students is presented. Prior to designing the prevention curriculum for their courses, faculty identify and discuss strategies to encourage active student participation. A few of the courses developed at the university are Computer Concepts in Education, Health Education in the Sociology of Drug Abuse, Practices of Human Resource Development, and Practicum in Criminal Justice. Participating faculty are invited to attend follow-up sessions with faculty members who previously developed modules to encourage the creative infusion of prevention material throughout the university’s curriculum. They also receive books, articles and bibliographic materials on prevention and active learning.
 
Evaluation of the program includes self- reporting questionnaires: one for faculty and one for students. The infused-course information form solicits from the faculty member how much direct instruction occurred on substance abuse, how much class time was spent discussing content related to substance abuse and the assignments that focus on substance abuse. For the students, a pre-test/post-test design was developed: the Curriculum Infusion Questionnaire includes questions about the use of substances as well as the perceptions of use by other students on the campus. In addition, questions are asked about the campus’ level of addressing this issue. Some of the questions on this instrument match those of the Core Survey.
 
Through the university’s attention to curriculum, three resources have been prepared: Prevention Across the Curriculum, Prevention Examples Across the Curriculum, and a videotape entitled "Perspective on Prevention Across the Curriculum."

 
Replacement Class Lecturers

Contacts:

University of Missouri - Columbia
Enrollment: 22,136
Public, Four Year Institution
 
Kim Dude, M.Ed.
Assistant Director of Student Life
Wellness Resource Center and ADAPT
205 Brady Commons
University of Missouri - Columbia
Columbia, MO 65211
(573) 882-4634
 
University of Portland
Enrollment: 2,600
Private, Four Year Institution
 
Bill Zuelke, M.S.
(New Contact: Dr. Barbara Norcross-Renner) (E-mail)
Counselor/Prevention Specialist
University Health Center
5000 N. Willamette Boulevard
Portland, OR 97203-5798
(503) 283-7134
 

Objectives:

• To provide alcohol awareness information to a greater number of students
 
• To increase collaboration and support of faculty members
 
• To increase faculty understanding of the alcohol awareness services available on the campus
 

Description:

Two programs, the ADAPT program, "Don’t Cancel That Class" at the University of Missouri - Columbia, and the "Absent Professor Program" at University of Portland, have been instituted to increase the infusion of alcohol abuse prevention messages into the academic curriculum. Offered to faculty members, this resource acknowledges that academic faculty may not on occasion be able to conduct a class because of professional obligations or illness. When that occurs the faculty member need only call to schedule a presentation in his/her class. Typically, the presentation can be adapted to blend with the specific curricular matter offered in the courses. At the University of Portland, half of the class sessions have alcohol education woven into the specific class material.
 
At both of these institutions, faculty are made aware of the service through a mailing, which is done twice a year at the University of Portland, and at the University of Missouri - Columbia the mass mailing is supplemented by ads in the faculty/staff newsletter.
 
The University of Missouri - Columbia offers professional staff or peer educators as guest lecturers in the "Don’t Cancel That Class" initiative. The program suggests to faculty members that they include some questions from the presentation on an upcoming examination, so that students will pay closer attention to the information covered.
 
The intent of both programs is to find ways of reaching students in academic settings. Campus alcohol awareness planners realize that voluntary prevention activities often do not reach those students who need the information the most. Similarly, these program planners seek ways of collaborating to a greater degree with faculty members.
 
In both cases, the results are quite positive. The "Absent Professor Program" notes that, following a class presentation by the alcohol counselor, some faculty have included this professional in their syllabus as a regular guest speaker. Other departments that use this resource are a class for all freshmen scholarship athletes, the special class for the baseball team at the beginning of training and all introductory education classes.
 
The "Don’t Cancel That Class" initiative at the University of Missouri - Columbia reports that coverage for a requesting faculty member’s class is guaranteed, even if the request is made at the last minute, as the ADAPT staff will drop everything to accommodate the request. Many faculty members have shared their pleasure with this service with other faculty members. In addition, some ADAPT peer educators and other volunteers have been recruited from students who liked what they heard in the classroom presentations.
 

 
Special Topics During Alcohol Awareness Week

Contacts:

Augsburg College
Enrollment: 2,958
Private, Four Year Institution
 
Casey McGuire (E-mail)
Health Service Coordinator
Lisa Broek, M.A.
Health Education Coordinator
2211 Riverside Avenue
Minneapolis, MN 55454
(612) 330-1337
 
Eastern Illinois University
Enrollment: 11,301
Public, Four Year Institution
 
Lynette Drake, M.S.
(New Contact: Eric Davidson) (E-mail)
Director
Health Service
Eastern Illinois University
Charleston, IL 61920
(217) 581-7015
 

Objectives:

• To include alcohol awareness topics in academic courses during theme weeks
 
• To reach students with alcohol awareness messages
 
• To incorporate the academic community in the week-long series of events
 

Description:

With the numerous activities typically occurring during awareness weeks, such as National Collegiate Alcohol Awareness Week, National Collegiate Health and Wellness Campaign and Safe Spring Break Week,
the inclusion of alcohol awareness in the academic curriculum is appropriate. Augsburg College and Eastern Illinois University demonstrate their success with this process.
 
To promote the effort, both Augsburg College and Eastern Illinois University sent a letter directly to faculty members requesting that they incorporate the subject of alcohol abuse to the extent possible into one of their lecture units during that week. With the goal of reducing alcohol misuse, the faculty members were encouraged to be as creative as possible in educating students about alcohol.
 
Each of these campuses attached a pledge sheet to the letter, which asked the faculty member to pledge some class time to an alcohol-related topic during the week and to indicate the specific topic. Eastern Illinois University notes that it is important to get the pledge sheets out prior to the start of the semester. Reminders are sent to faculty members through the university newsletter close to the target date. Thank you letters are sent to all faculty who participate, and Eastern Illinois University forwards a master list of participants to the Vice President for Academic Affairs, as well as to the Vice President for Student Affairs.
 
To help in the process of identifying potential topics, Augsburg College and Eastern Illinois University provide the faculty with a listing of possible topics that might be included in specific courses. For example, in art courses, assignments may be made to make posters advertising the week-long events or issues such as alcohol abuse. Business courses might include information on Employee Assistance Programs, corporate policies, effects of substance use on insurance rates, absenteeism, alcohol advertising and the effects of substance abuse on the family. English courses might include discussions of or assignments on literature in which alcoholism is the theme, writing assignments on alcohol topics or writing a daily journal. Numerous other departments and courses are noted in these listings (e.g., Anthropology, Education, Foreign Languages, Health and Physical Education, Psychology, Sociology, Human Services, Women’s Studies, Journalism, Mathematics, Music, Home Economics, History and Science).
 
Results from this initiative document the numerous students who are involved in the classes. Augsburg College, in particular, finds this approach helpful in reaching commuter and evening students with essential prevention information. Eastern Illinois University notes that the number of faculty members who pledge increases each year.
 

 
Student Prevention Projects

Contact:

University of California at
Santa Barbara
Enrollment: 17,834
Public, Four Year Institution
 
Judy Hearsum, M.S. (E-mail)
Director of AOD Program
Student Health Services
Santa Barbara, CA 93106
(805) 893-2263
 

Objectives:

• To provide students with prevention projects that complement their academic coursework
 
• To promote opportunities that will change student substance use behavior
 

Description:

In an attempt to enhance the incorporation of drug and alcohol information in academic courses, the university’s Alcohol and Other Drug Program (AODP) offers opportunities for students to get involved in aspects of health promotion and disease prevention. This builds on preliminary research that indicates that little behavior change occurs when students are not actively involved. Since the AODP staff enlists students for prevention projects based on their academic or personal interest, this process takes curriculum infusion one step further.
 
The initial approach attempted was to recruit students to be volunteers in the AODP. Pre-law majors were trained to present responsible beverage service to alcohol servers in local bars and restaurants; business majors assisted in starting and running a mocktail catering service; students interested in planning special events and alternative activities were brought together for this purpose; and education majors and others working with young people were trained to present AOD programs in elementary and junior high schools. The major difficulty with these volunteer opportunities was that they required complete oversight by AODP staff. This intensive professional involvement was difficult to maintain, particularly with some grant-funded personnel.
 
Since those initial student involvement efforts, academic courses have evolved to a greater level. A successful example is the collaboration within the Communications Department to produce a campus-wide media campaign. A faculty member who teaches Persuasion volunteered to work with the AODP. The resulting project looks like this:
 
• The faculty member teaches students about the various theories of persuasion used by advertisers to sell their products.
 
• Students are assigned to choose one of the theories and a target audience around which to design a media project that will persuade the intended audience members not to engage in specific alcohol-related problem behavior (areas of emphasis have included drinking and driving, bicycling under the influence and extensive heavy drinking).
 
• Staff from the AODP help the faculty member to select relevant articles that are available for student research in the library.
 
• AODP staff conduct guest lectures for the class on the selected topic.
 
• At the end of the course, students present their project to the class, sharing statistics and knowledge gained through the research.
 
Following the class, students are invited to participate as interns working with the AODP staff to refine, mass produce and distribute the class projects, as well as to assist with other media-related needs. Faculty provide the academic supervision and credit.
 
Other examples are found in the Dramatic Arts department with a class using various theater techniques as prevention tools and in the Performing Arts department where entertainment is solicited for a regular alcohol-free night club and coffee house on campus.
 
With these collaborative efforts, more students are reached through the class, the internships and the resulting campaigns and performances. Faculty members are pleased to have ideas for the class projects that will have a positive impact on students’ lives.
 

 
Substance Abuse/Addictions Course

Contacts:

Cabrini College
Enrollment: 1,818
Private, Four Year Institution
 
Cynthia Belliveau, Ph.D.
Health Educator
610 King of Prussia Road
Radnor, PA 19087
(610) 902-8568
 
Elizabethtown College
Enrollment: 1,932
Private, Four Year Institution
 
Carolyn Olivett
Prevention Coordinator
1 Alpha Drive
Elizabethtown, PA 17022
(717) 361-1353
 
Millersville University
Enrollment: 7,417
Public, Four Year Institution
 
David Hill, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
 
Elizabeth Thyrum, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Psychology Department
Millersville, PA 17551-0302
(717) 872-3089
 

Objectives:

• To provide an academic course on alcohol, drugs and addiction
 
• To provide an applied focus within the academic course context
 
• To generate personal awareness on substance use and abuse issues
 

Description:

Undergraduate courses on drugs and alcohol provide an opportunity for an in-depth and research-based examination of these substances. Typically included in these courses are an understanding of the pharmacology of drugs and alcohol, the issue of substance abuse and the variety of issues surrounding the addiction process. In addition, academic courses often offer an introduction to the societal context of the use of the substances.
 
A synopsis of the course goals illustrates differences in the intent and philosophy of the courses. For example, the addictions course at Elizabethtown College has as its goal "to present the current concepts of addiction theory and evaluate the complexity of the many forms of addictive behavior and the consequences in our society." Millersville University’s course, "Psychology of Drug Addiction," provides two areas of focus: "to explore the personal, psychological, neurochemical, cultural and family systemic aspects of addiction"; and "to examine the various approaches to assessment, diagnosis and treatment." The course at Cabrini College is designed to "investigate the impact of drugs and alcohol on communities, individuals and society."
 
The content of the classes includes issues such as the history of alcohol and drug use in society, and the societal impact and pharmacology. Discussions on addiction, including its causes, progression and treatment, are common. Topics emphasized include the relationship of substance use to lifestyle choices, sexually transmitted diseases, anger and violence, harm reduction and environmental change. Societal strategies including prevention, intervention and treatment are also often found.
 
What is often unique about the courses is the way in which they are implemented. For example, Cabrini College’s course includes a review of the programs and services available in the community. Research is also emphasized: students design and implement a project that combines their personal needs and interests with the class material. Students are given the tools for assessing the current status and needs of the community including needs assessments, community analysis, and subjective and objective research; further, they are given the direction to design and implement an intervention strategy.
 
At Millersville University, the course emphasizes an applied focus; class members prepare a paper in which they explore their personal and family history regarding substances and how these have been involved in their life activities and stresses. Quiz Bowl, a competitive game among groups, is another experiential exercise. Practice essays are given frequently and serve as a repertoire for questions on the mid-term examination. Extra credit points are also available for various activities, one of which is a self-experiment: the student experiments for a limited period of time and then prepares a written report. Examples of self-experiments include giving up alcohol, attending self-help group meetings, and participating in a positive health promotion activity.
 
The course at Elizabethtown College includes a similar combination of lecture, video, experiential learning and class discussion. The interactive class incorporates exercises on "natural highs," responsibility for one’s own life, changing the environment, direct and indirect personal pressure and support systems for individuals. This course requires an opinion paper entitled, "My personal beliefs about alcohol use and abuse in my life".
 

 
Writing From Interviews

Contacts:

Plymouth State College
Enrollment: 3,936
Public, Four Year Institution
 
Meg Peterson, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Department of English
 
Patricia Kirby
(New Contact: Nancy Dyer, LCSW, LADAC) (E-mail)
Wellness Center
Plymouth State College
Plymouth, NH 03264
(603) 535-2853
 

Objectives:

• To provide students with in-depth information about drugs and alcohol
 
• To prepare a product that builds upon qualitative interview-based research
 
• To promote a new campus norm of self-and-other honoring, care and respect in regard to drugs and alcohol
 

Description:

The campus effort encourages helping members of the campus community who are non-users of alcohol or drugs and those who are legal and low-risk users of alcohol to become more connected through the refinement of the campus-wide Alcohol and Other Drug Program; curriculum infusion is a significant aspect of this effort.
 
Within this curriculum infusion process, an English course, Qualitative Research Writing, was prepared. Subtitled "Writing from Interviews," the course centered around the writing of a book on the life histories of students, faculty and staff who had chosen not to use drugs or alcohol or had chosen to use alcohol in a legal, low-risk manner. The course produced a book to be used in campus classes, as well as potentially beyond the college setting.
 
The class outline reports that each student is responsible for contributing to the collaborative writing of an introductory section for the book and an afterword. Further, each student is expected to conduct two interviews, following an interview schedule developed in class. Each interview was approximately an hour and one-half long; full transcriptions were part of the expectation. Data presentations of the results of the interviews with non-or low-risk using informants were made to the entire class. Following this process, students wrote the results of their interviews into stories suitable for inclusion in the final book; these write-ups were designed to reflect, as much as possible, the interviewee’s own voice.
 
Students were also asked to prepare a response journal, in which they reflected on readings, issues, progress and group process both inside and outside of class. To identify the individuals to be interviewed a letter was sent to selected people in the campus community. The letter states that the "book is intended to be a collection of stories written about people who choose healthy lifestyles, especially those which include non-use or low-risk-use of alcoholic beverages and non-use of illegal drugs." The letter specifies that an intent is to make these positive lifestyle experiences more visible at the institution.
 
The result of this class project is a 40-page booklet entitled "Beyond the Bottles and Cans: Portraits of Non-Drinkers of Alcohol at Plymouth State College." The students’ names appear on the cover, but no individual writers are linked to the stories; every student writer had a part in all the stories. The book, for use in campus classes and possibly beyond the college setting, contains editorial notes, 12 profiles and an afterword. Each of the profiles indicates an interviewee’s name and a descriptor such as "Standing Tall," "A Non-Conformist and Proud of It," "Learning the Hard Way," and "An Optimistic Independence."
 

 
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Education

Contact:

Texas A&M University System at Baylor College of Dentistry
Enrollment: 500
Public, Four Year Institution
 
Tommy W. Gage, D.D.S., Ph.D. (E-mail)
Professor
Director of Pharmacology
P.O. Box 660677
Dallas, TX 75266-0677
(214) 828-8308
 

Objectives:

• To provide a required curriculum on alcohol and drug abuse
 
• To offer dental students personal insight into the effect of alcohol abuse on family life and dental practices
 

Description:

The faculty of the College of Dentistry is enthusiastic about including alcohol/drug education in the curriculum. This information is incorporated into an existing pharmacology course, guaranteeing that all second, third and fourth year dental and senior dental hygienist students receive the information. Guidelines developed by the American Dental Association and interaction with the two other state dental colleges provide additional support for this curriculum.
 
Included in the course content is the pharmacology associated with alcohol use, effects of alcohol on the body’s systems, adverse effects of alcohol misuse, and treatment considerations with alcoholism. The curriculum also delineates penalties for driving under the influence of alcohol and consequences associated with repeat offenders. The Texas Peer Assistance Program provides input from recovering dentists who offer personal insight into how alcohol and drug abuse affected their lives, their families’ lives, and their practices.
 
Students are interested in this subject because many have a family member or friend for whom alcohol is, or has been, a problem. Further, since students are future health care providers who will be treating patients with alcohol or drug abuse backgrounds, they share concern about this topic.

 
Alcohol Use and Abuse

Contact:

Bloomsburg University
Enrollment: 7,312
Public, Four Year Institution
 
Margie Eckroth-Bucher, M.S.N. (E-mail)
Assistant Professor
3122 McCormick Center for Human Services
400 East Second Street
Bloomsburg, PA 17815
(717) 389-4607
 

Objectives:

• To provide an overview of alcohol issues to students from all disciplines
 
• To promote personal decision making on responsible choices regarding use or non-use of addictive substances
 
• To broaden the knowledge base of students regarding the potential risks associated with alcohol use
 

Description:

Alcohol Use and Abuse is a three-credit course that focuses on the nature of alcohol problems, sociocultural attitudes towards drinking, and alcohol’s effects on the body. The impact of alcoholism on adolescents, professional workers, women, the elderly, and family is emphasized. Discussion of alcohol use and misuse in the American population includes an examination of prevention, intervention, and referral. Lectures are used to provide some of the facts; however, the primary strategy is classroom discussion on specific topics. The Socratic method, as well as debate, creates an atmosphere where critical thinking on identifying and clarifying values occurs.
 
Course requirements include attending an open Alcoholics Anonymous meeting and writing a paper on the group process observed. Preparing a letter to a person who is seen as having the power to influence the use and abuse of alcohol is also part of the course, as are class presentations on related topics, or a campus-wide alcohol project.
 
The course is required for students majoring in criminal justice. Many students have written to the university president suggesting that the course be made mandatory for first-year students. The course appears successful because of the increase in the factual knowledge base of students.

 
Concentration in Substance Abuse/Addictions

Contact:

Troy State University at Montgomery
Enrollment: 3,360
Public, Four Year Institution
 
Donald Thompson, Ed.D. (E-mail)
Dean
Division of Counseling, Education and Psychology
P.O. Drawer 4419
Montgomery, AL 36103-4419
(334) 241-9577
 

Objectives:

• To provide undergraduate and graduate students with the opportunity for an in-depth study of substance abuse issues
 
• To permit students to obtain a Certificate of Completion for substance abuse and addiction courses
 

Description:

The Department of Counseling and Human Development offers a concentration in substance abuse and addiction issues. Six 5 1/4 hour courses are offered for academic credit, and a Certificate of Completion, presented jointly by TSUM and the Alabama Department of Mental Health, Division of Substance Abuse, is granted to students following their successful completion of the six courses. While each of the courses is rated for graduate credit, four of the courses may be taken by undergraduate students.
 
The Physiological Dynamics of Alcohol and Other Drugs course emphasizes the physiological and psychological dynamics and related behavioral implications associated with the use of drugs or alcohol. Diagnostic procedures for determining dependency are also discussed. Commonly abused drugs and alcohol are the focus of the Drug Education, Prevention and Intervention course. This course also examines characteristics of individuals who are at high risk to become substance abusers or addicts. Prevention and intervention strategies and techniques for various age groups and special populations are covered.
 
The Treatment of Addictive Family Diseases course highlights typical characteristics of dysfunctional families and roles found in the setting. Intervention techniques, family education, and guidelines for therapy are provided. The course entitled Treatment Theories and Modalities of Addictive Diseases studies historical and evolutionary perspectives on treating addiction. Information on 12-step programs and their principles is provided.
 
The Seminar on Prevention/Treatment of Chemical Dependencies, open to graduate students, examines issues to be addressed by the counselor to promote treatment and recovery. An internship in Substance Abuse/Addictions provides advanced graduate students with a clinical experience in their area of specialization, and weekly seminars offer the opportunity to reflect upon this experience.

 
Consortia Curriculum Infusion Project

Contact:

Rowan University
Enrollment: 9,030
Private, Four Year Institution
 
Linda R. Jeffrey, Ph.D.
Professor of Psychology
Psychology Department
Rowan University
Glassboro, NJ 08028
(609) 256-4500 ext. 3525
 

Objectives:

• To make curriculum infusion an integral part of prevention efforts
 
• To provide outreach to college faculty
 
• To encourage faculty to revise course offerings to include drug and alcohol abuse prevention information
 
• To provide commuter students and students resistant to traditional prevention programming with drug and alcohol information
 

Description:

The New Jersey Consortia on Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention Education comprises one statewide higher education consortium and three regional consortia. Public and private colleges and universities throughout the state are consortia members. The curriculum infusion project offers faculty members from member institutions the opportunity to revise their course offerings to include drug and alcohol prevention information. Twenty-seven faculty members became involved in developing curriculum infusion syllabi and modules during the first two years of the project. In addition, training events are held at regional consortia meetings and statewide conferences and meetings.
 
The emphasis on curriculum infusion was initiated as a strategic approach to involve faculty in the transformation of campus norms. Strategies to reach commuter students and students in community colleges were also needed, as these students were not available for traditional student life programming outside the classroom.
 
Integral to the success of the project is the 10-year record of collaboration and cooperation demonstrated by the New Jersey Higher Education Consortium. This history of sharing ideas and resources motivated campuses to respond to drug and alcohol prevention issues. Identified as obstacles were widespread collegiate acceptance of alcohol abuse as a normal part of the college experience and an emphasis upon disciplinary interventions to address consequences of alcohol abuse. The proactive emphasis on a comprehensive prevention plan and program implementation, coupled with the helpfulness and camaraderie among consortia members, helps in the success of the program.
 
To participate in the curriculum infusion project, a faculty member must be a full-time or regular adjunct instructor at his/her institution and must attend three meetings in his/her region during one semester and the one-day conference. Those selected to participate are expected to write a document to be included in the project handbook, and a timeline for presenting the revised or new course material to his/her academic department is also needed. Each participant must also provide outreach to other faculty members about curriculum infusion and help identify additional faculty members who might become involved in the project. Although many faculty members say that they would participate without remuneration, a $500 stipend is offered as an incentive. The syllabi and modules developed during the first phase of this curriculum infusion project have been compiled into a handbook which has been distributed to all consortia members and made available to interested faculty.
 
Courses for which materials were developed or revised include Cultural Anthropology, College Study Skills, Healthful Living, Human Development, Introduction to Psychology, Nature and Needs of the Handicapped, Quantitative Methods in Social Science Research, Abnormal Psychology, Fundamentals of Peer Education, and Infusing Alcohol/Drug Abuse Prevention and Violence Against Women into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing curriculum.

 
Course Module Development Grants

Contact:

College of Charleston
Enrollment: 10,613
Public, Four Year Institution
 
Jason P. Lawandales (E-mail)
Associate Director
Substance Abuse Prevention
181 Calhoun Street
Charleston, SC 29424
(803) 953-5744
 

Objectives:

• To enhance the established substance abuse prevention programs through curricular activity
 
• To empower students
 
• To assist in the process of changing campus norms related to alcohol
 

Description:

Through curriculum infusion, the Course Module Development Grant Initiative builds upon the activities already in place at the college, including wellness promotion, media-based strategies, coalition building, and policy and enforcement initiatives.
 
The Office of Substance Abuse Prevention has prepared an application form for the curriculum infusion grants of $290. Responses to the following four questions are elicited: (1) Why would this course be an appropriate one for a prevention unit? (2) What ideas/strategies might you employ in this course to influence students to question their attitudes/behaviors in relation to the abuse of alcohol and the use of illicit drugs? (3) How might you involve students as "active learners" who will become engaged in the activities/learning of your module? (4) What are the major reasons for your interest in participating in this project? Grants are awarded to faculty members for their curriculum infusion efforts.
 
Strategies identified are varied. One faculty member engages students in activities designed to modify their expectations regarding alcohol’s positive effects and another asks students to draw charts and graphs to illustrate data related to alcohol problems. In another class, students develop multi-media instructional modules designed to make the teaching and learning of the information more interesting and relevant. As "active learners," students are involved in presentations created by their peers.
 
Faculty members identify a variety of reasons for their interest in participating in this project. These include expanding student interest in this topic area, contributing to social service, making the course topic more useful, promoting student-faculty cooperation, infusing technology across the curriculum, and assisting students to develop competence in teaching strategies for future classes.

 
Curriculum Infusion Project

Contact:

Illinois State University
Enrollment: 19,294
Public, Four Year Institution
 
Roger B. Weller, Ph.D. (E-mail)
Project Director
2540 Student Health Service
Illinois State University
Normal, IL 61790
(309) 438-2419
(309) 438-8329
 

Objectives:

• To infuse alcohol and drug content and issues into the subject matter of courses with multiple sections
 
• To encourage students to be responsible for their actions and behavior, including a reduction in excessive drinking
 
• To promote healthy lifestyles among students
 

Description:

The Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs (ATOD) Curriculum Infusion Project is designed to promote educational opportunities that help students to adopt healthy lifestyles. After two years of planning, devoted primarily to gaining administrative and faculty support, as well as the incorporation of the ATOD issues into selected courses, a large scale infusion effort was implemented.
 
Eight modules with multiple sections were designed, and approximately 70 faculty/staff members, handling 75 course sections, are infusing the appropriate module into their course. Taught in five different colleges on the campus, the eight modules are: Learning Communities (freshman seminar), First Aid, Nutrition, Child Growth and Development, Early Childhood Education, Courtship and Marriage, Personal Fitness, and Healthful Family Living. Detailed goal statements, learning objectives, ATOD content, methodology, course materials, and process and products evaluation instruments are included in each module.
 
A workshop and resource materials are offered to provide support to those faculty members who are involved in infusing alcohol issues into their courses, The campus Health Stop Resource Center holds an open house to acquaint faculty with materials available for their use, such as videotapes, posters, printed materials, and "faculty packets" that include information on alcohol and drugs. Support for the curriculum infusion program is also provided through several lunches where topics are discussed and suggestions for improving delivery of content material are offered. The program’s success can be credited to the strong endorsement by the upper level administration and the enthusiasm and commitment demonstrated by participating faculty.
 
Nearly 2,500 students are enrolled annually, and each module incorporates an evaluation component. Faculty and students are very pleased with the course content and style. More than 50 percent of the students said they benefited from the course and could immediately apply content learned and issues discussed to their current lifestyle.

 
OPTIONS Program

Contact:

Richard Stockton College
Enrollment: 5,733
Public, Four Year Institution
 
Patrick Shields, M.A.
Assistant Director
Alcohol/Drug Prevention
The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey
Pomona, NJ 08240
(609) 652-4987
 

Objectives:

• To reduce negative behaviors related to students’ alcohol/drug use
 
• To offer students who are in violation of campus policy the option to enroll in an elective course in alcohol/drug education
 

Description:

The OPTIONS Program is designed to provide an alternative sanction for students who have violated the college’s alcohol/drug policies. The student may enroll in a four-credit elective course in place of participation in the standard alcohol education program and community service activity. The student is responsible for paying for the course and must secure a passing grade. If a student misses more than two classes he/she is removed from the class roster and forfeits the option and must complete the standard program. The elective course, The Psychology of Well-Being, is open to all undergraduate students, as well as those who self-select from the OPTIONS Program. This course provides intensive alcohol/drug education by exploring the psychological principles of physical and mental health. Topics include the body’s biological systems, stress, substance abuse, diet and exercise, interpersonal relationships, health problems, anxieties, depression, suicide, eating disorders, sleeping disorders, and phobias. The linkages among the problems are emphasized, with particular attention to those common among college-age adults. Also emphasized is the relationship between substance abuse and academic performance and difficulties in interpersonal relationships, depression and anxiety, and health problems. Campus planners offer this emphasis because research demonstrates that students who violate campus alcohol/drug policies typically are at higher risk of incurring alcohol-related negative consequences such as poor grades, lateness, and absenteeism.
 
A research survey is given at the beginning of the class, at the end of the class, and at a three month follow-up period. The survey asks about the use of drugs and alcohol and incorporates questions from the Core Survey and the survey from the Midwest Institute on Drug Use. While a decline in mean scores for some substance use is noted, limited conclusions can be drawn from this because of the small sample size.

 
Substance Abuse Prevention Program

Contact:

University of Oregon
Enrollment: 17,138
Public, Four Year Institution
 
E. Miki Mace, M.S. (E-mail)
Program Administrator
180-A Esslinger Hall
Eugene, OR 97403
(541) 346-3397
 

Objectives:

• To reach undergraduate and graduate students interested in substance abuse issues
 
• To provide education and training for community professionals who specialize in counseling, teaching, law enforcement, social work and related fields
 
• To offer a variety of courses, seminars, conferences and practica through self-supporting funding
 

Description:

The Substance Abuse Prevention Program (SAPP), designed in 1990, is a self-supported program that offers numerous education and training opportunities to students and community professionals. Included are societal issues, prevention and intervention, abuse and dependency, intervention and referral. This innovative program provides students with education, information, skills, strategies, and social awareness by offering a diverse set of courses and workshops with a practical, experiential emphasis. The program offerings have been expanded beyond substance abuse issues and now include domestic violence, hate crimes, sexual abuse, diversity, attachment disorders, gangs and violence. SAPP uses speakers and instructors who work hands-on in the field of addiction and/or other social service professions.
 
In the 1995-96 academic year, over 6,000 students were enrolled in SAPP activities. The Summer Institute filled 16 courses, with more than 500 undergraduate and 140 graduate students. During the academic year, approximately $350,000 was generated from these self-supported courses, all of which were taken for academic credit. SAPP was also successful in placing over 75 students in internships or practica on and off the campus. The program is staffed by two full-time faculty, one half-time secretary, student volunteers, and practicum students.
 
The key to the project’s success is ongoing awareness of student needs and sensitivity to seminar and course content. Support services, such as on-site debriefing, are provided for controversial or sensitive presentations. Also helpful to the success of this effort are referral services, an open, inviting climate where students may learn in a non-threatening and non-judgmental atmosphere, and the fact that the tools offered are easily transferrable to the real-world setting.